What does your average working day consist of?

Chances are, you spend the majority of it sat at your desk or sat in meetings.

In recent years, there has been a stream of research revealing the impact this is having on our wellbeing. Sitting has been found to be as bad for your health as smoking, as hours spent sitting at a desk every day can increase your risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
As well as all this, slumping over your chair or even sitting in the wrong chair can cause back pain, neck pain and leg discomfort. According to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) the total number of work-related musculoskeletal disorder cases in 2014 and 2015 was 553,000.
Those working with display screen equipment were particularly at risk and ergonomic factors such as the position of the keyboard, monitor and mouse, as well as posture and chair design can all have an impact on your wellbeing at work.
While there can be serious health issues associated with sitting for long hours, there are ways you can reduce this, and they all start with improving your posture. Here are six ways you can do just that…

1. Sit in the correct position

Believe it or not, there is an ideal seated position that puts less stress and strain on your body. Bustle advises making sure your head is up and your eyesight falls on the upper third of your monitor; keeping your elbows at a 90-degree angle with wrists straight and hands poised above the keyboard; and keeping your spine erect with feet supported on the floor or a foot rest.

2. Take regular breaks

You wouldn’t play sport for eight hours without taking a break, so why do so many of us take this attitude when it comes to sitting at our desks? BT suggests breaking up your time at the desk by going for a little walk of around 5-10 minutes every hour. Just don’t wait until you start to get aches and pains.

3. Stretch

While it might not be advisable to roll out your yoga mat and start doing sun salutations at regular intervals throughout the day, gently stretching your neck, back, arms and wrists will help loosen up your muscles.

4. Consider a standing desk

Avoid sitting for too long by opting for a standing desk. When you feel you need a break from sitting down, you can move the desk to allow you to continue working while you’re stood up. Standing desks also have an added benefit. According to a recent study by Texas A&M University, standing desks improve productivity by 50%.

6. Invest in ergonomic chairs

Everyone is built differently so your ordinary static office chair might be great for one person, but lack support for another. An ergonomic chair can be adjusted to give you support in all the right places. And having the correct chair is the first step you can take to avoid injury at your desk.
Whether you’d like to invest in standing desks, or upgrade your old office chairs to ones with greater ergonomic functionality, speak to Kerr today. You can even test and trial a selection of chairs in your own office to find the perfect fit for you.

Whether you’d like to invest in standing desks, or upgrade your old office chairs to ones with greater ergonomic functionality, speak to Kerr today.
You can even test and trial a selection of chairs in your own office to find the perfect fit for you.

Sources:
http://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/improve-posture-desk-computer-pc-back-pain-neck-strain-11364046545769
https://www.bustle.com/articles/141561-how-you-should-sit-at-your-desk-according-to-science
http://www.techrepublic.com/article/is-sitting-really-the-new-smoking-an-in-depth-discussion-with-the-experts/
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/10/03/relieve-back-pain_n_10482128.html
http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/10/13/simple-ways-to-look-after-your-posture-at-work/
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/standing-desks-boost-productivity-by-nearly-50-per-cent-a3260871.html

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